The Lifting of the Veil

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I realized this morning,how wonderful it is to just be alive.With my love and partner Marcelle,we realize that the very breath we have been given is Sacred.It is indeed a time to celebrate our blossoming...to get excited about finally Knowing.Our awareness is expanding...we see what we have never seen...The Truth is shining brighter than ever before.The veil is really lifting. Of course there will be chaos...there will be confusion...the transition will reveal what we have not wanted to see.But there is no turning back.It is inevitable that what is false will end.Illusion can never be True.What is not real,will not last. I sit writing this ,calm in the knowing...that all is on schedule...The great Time we have all been waiting for has come.We should not fear the incredible change that is about to take place...If we believe what we say we believe..Then All will be well..and a New Day will begin. Stephen {parkstepp} Twitter--@parkstepp FaceBook--Stephen Parker
  • September 29, 2011 6:58 am
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    Who Germany Wants to Be

    by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

    Zoe Chace’s report for Planet Money on the budgetary meltdown in Greece has got to be one of the better pieces of information journalism I’ve heard on NPR’s morning air. Lost in the debate of bailout-no bailout over Greece’s debt — and the necessity of Germany floating it — runs an undercurrent: the narrative of belonging to a unified Europe, and the varying perspectives of Germans on their responsibilities and the kind of community they want to be part of.

    Chace’s focused narrative and inclusion of the voices of Germans from several walks of life deepen our understanding of some of the motivating factors driving this debate. She gives the listener a sense of history: how that past is living forward in the German psyche and how their identity — as a broken people, a vibrant culture, and a affluent nation — is predicated on the past and on whom Germans want to be in the future.

    My only regret is the reporter’s use of “Kumbaya” in the piece. As I’ve shared before, I’ve taken Vincent Harding’s story to heart and will never use that reference again in such a way. Nonetheless, it’s a slight quibble and this type of reporting on thick subjects is something I long to hear more of.

    Did anybody else listen to this? What’s your take? I’m also thinking through this as we push forward with a more ambitious agenda for On Being online in the coming year. Let’s talk.

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